Chapter 3: Housing

Closeddate_range21 Jul, 2021, 9:00am - 1 Oct, 2021, 5:00pm

Aim: To facilitate the provision of sustainable residential neighbourhoods based on healthy placemaking in accordance with the core strategy, informed by high quality design principles, an appropriate density of development at suitable locations; an appropriate mix of house sizes, types and tenures to meet a variety of household needs and to promote balanced and sustainable communities.

3.0          Introduction

The Council acknowledges the need to provide an adequate supply of quality housing to meet existing and future demand. Housing will be required to cater for existing and changing population requirements, such as social and affordable housing, renewal/ upgrade and replacement of existing stock, student accommodation, smaller families, an ageing population with resultant requirements for additional housing responses. Housing supply must be informed by the need to create sustainable communities and neighbourhoods with a strong emphasis on quality design and placemaking.

3.1          Policy Context

The housing shortage arising from the recession in 2008-2013 gave rise to a prolonged period of inactivity in residential construction. Recovery in the market has been slow and has been further exacerbated with the Covid 19 pandemic. The response to the housing shortage has been co-ordinated at a national level through the introduction of legislation and policy initiatives that aim to increase output.

3.1.1     Project Ireland 2040 – National Planning Framework (2018)

The NPF sets out National Policy Objectives that support the delivery of new homes in suitable places to achieve an overall target of 550,000 additional households nationwide by 2040. It identifies key elements that impact on quality of life including the quality of our immediate environment, the ability to access services and amenities and the prospect of securing employment. In this regard it supports providing new homes including new social housing in locations that can support sustainable development, with adequate services and easier access to work, childcare, education, healthcare and green infrastructure.

3.1.2      Implementation Roadmap for the NPF (2018)

As outlined in Chapter 2, the Implementation Roadmap contains target figures for all counties throughout Ireland. Anticipated growth in Carlow is projected at an additional 5-6,000 persons by 2026 or 7,000 – 8,500 persons by 2031.

Table 3.1 Population Target Figures Co. Carlow

 

2016

2026

2031

Carlow

56,932

62,000-63,000

64,000-65,000

3.1.3      Housing Supply Target Methodology

Housing Supply Target Methodology for Development Planning was issued by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage under Section 28 Guidelines in December 2020. It projects housing demand based on the findings of the ESRI paper Structural Housing Demand at County Level. Application of the methodology which includes convergence between existing housing output and the NPF will give rise to the need to accommodate an additional 3,107 households over the Plan period 2022-2028. Allocation of household projections throughout the County is outlined in Table 2.7 Chapter 2.

3.1.4      Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy (RSES) for the Southern Region (2020)

The Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy (RSES) provides a long-term strategic framework for the spatial, economic and social development of the Southern Region.  It recognises the need to provide an adequate supply of quality housing to meet existing and future, demand including addressing the current housing crisis and homelessness. It seeks to promote economic prosperity, accommodating growth and sustainable development in suitable places, protecting and enhancing the environment, combatting climate change, improving towns and cities, supporting rural development and identifying priorities for infrastructure development. The RSES identifies Carlow Town for targeted compact growth of a minimum of 30% (RPO 14).

3.1.5      Rebuilding Ireland – Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness, 2016

Rebuilding Ireland is a Government action plan for tackling the housing crisis and homelessness. It provides a multi-stranded approach to achieving key housing objectives, including to significantly increase the supply of social housing and all homes generally and to tackle homelessness. The plan sets out five pillars for the delivery of housing.

  1. Address homelessness
  2. Accelerate social housing
  3. Build more homes
  4. Improve the rental sector, and
  5. Utilise existing housing

The Government has put in place various mechanisms to support the increased supply of housing throughout the country.

3.1.6   Housing for All / Programme for Government: Our Shared Future (2020)

The ‘Programme for Government: Our Shared Future’ was published in June 2020 and sets out key goals the Government will pursue over its term. This Programme places emphasis on housing policy through the ‘Housing for All’ mission. ‘Housing for All’ is based on eight pillars setting a five-year vision for housing policy:

  • Put affordability at the heart of the housing system.
  • Prioritise the increased supply of public, social and affordable homes.
  • Progress a State-backed affordable home purchase scheme to promote home ownership.
  • Increase the social housing stock by more than 50,000, with an emphasis on new builds.
  • Tackle homelessness.
  • Ensure local authorities are central to delivering housing.
  • Work with the private sector to ensure an appropriate mix and type of housing is provided nationally.
  • Improve the supply and affordability of rental accommodation and the security of tenure for renters.

The Government is expected to expand on the Housing for All programme in 2021, setting out further strategy that will shape the housing landscape over the coming years.

3.2          Legislative Changes

Arising from Rebuilding Ireland a number of new legislative provisions have been introduced by government aiming to increase the output of housing and include;

  • The Urban Regeneration and Housing Act 2015 included changes to Part V of the Planning and Development Act  2000 (as amended), with the affordable housing requirement being removed and the social housing obligation being lowered from 20% to 10% for developments of 10 or more units. Provision was included for the introduction of a Vacant Site Levy (see Section 3.3).
  • Section 24A of the Residential Tenancies Act 2004 (as amended) sets out the requirements for designating a Rent Pressure Zone. At the time of writing, the Carlow Local Electoral Area is designated as a Rent Pressure Zone.
  • Section 38 of the Residential Tenancies (Amendment) Act 2019 sets out the  legislative requirements for a person who intends to let their property for short-term letting purposes if the property is located within a Rent Pressure Zone.
  • Section 3 of the Planning and Development Residential Tenancies Act 2016 introduced, for a limited period, arrangements for fast track planning applications for Strategic Housing Developments (SHDs) of 100 or more housing units, student accommodation of 200 or more bed spaces, or shared accommodation of 200 or more bed spaces, to be made directly to An Bord Pleanála for determination.

3.3          Regeneration Areas

The Urban Regeneration and Housing Act 2015 introduced a mechanism for the application of a vacant site levy  to incentivise the use and development of vacant and under-utilised lands for housing and regeneration purposes.

In Carlow, the application of the levy will seek to support compact growth, the regeneration and renewal of underutilised lands in the urban zoned areas and meeting the housing needs of the County.

The levy is applicable to residential land and regeneration lands which are defined as follows:

  • Residential land zoned for use solely or primarily for residential purposes in accordance with Section 10(2)(a) of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended).
  • Regeneration land identified for renewal and regeneration in accordance with Section 10(2)(h) of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended).

Regeneration Areas – Objective

It is an objective of the Council to;

RA. O1

Encourage and facilitate the appropriate development of sites and areas in need of development and renewal in order to prevent:

  • Adverse effects on existing amenities in such areas, in particular as a result of the ruinous or neglected condition of any land
  • Urban blight or decay
  • Anti-social behaviour, or
  • A shortage of habitable houses or of land suitable for residential use or a mixture of residential and other uses

3.3.1      Lands Identified For Residential Use

The following lands zoned for residential or primarily residential purposes are included for the purposes of the Vacant Site Levy:

Land Uses

Zonings

Residential

Existing Residential Residential 1

Residential

New Residential  Residential 2

For the purposes of this Plan the ‘Regeneration’ Lands as defined under the Urban Regeneration Act 2015 (as amended), applies to the following zonings:

Land Uses

Zonings

Commercial

Town Centre, Village Centre, Mixed Use, Neighbourhood Centre, District Centre, Neighbourhood Facilities, Commercial / Residential

Employment

Enterprise and Employment, Industry, Business and Innovation, Manufacturing, Tourism, Leisure

Services

Community Services, Educational 

3.3.2      Implementation of the Vacant Site Levy

As part of the active land management strategy for the County, the Council will maintain a Vacant Site Register, identifying sites which are vacant and meet the requirements of the Urban Regeneration and Housing Act (as amended). This Register will be monitored and reviewed by the Council on a regular basis.  Section 16 of the Urban Regeneration and Housing Act 2015 (as amended) sets out the levy due, which is equal to 7% of the market value of the site for 2019 and subsequent years (unless otherwise revised).

Vacant Site Levy - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to;

RA. P1

Promote the sustainable development of vacant residential and regeneration sites as appropriate on zoned lands and identified in Section 3.3.1 in accordance with the requirements of the Urban Regeneration and Housing Act 2015 (as amended).

3.3.3      Regeneration Areas

In recognition of the need to promote and facilitate compact growth and the consolidation of development in urban areas, this Plan has identified lands on which regeneration proposals will be supported. Such regeneration projects will assist in the creation of more sustainable neighbourhoods and communities through enhancements to the public realm and built environment which will make the areas more attractive for economic investment. These regeneration areas are set out in Chapter 15.

Regeneration Areas – Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

RA. P1

Support and facilitate investment in town and village centres and within areas and lands in the County identified for regeneration as set out on the Land Use Zoning Maps and to collaborate with landowners and stakeholders in the development of these lands.

3.4 Housing Strategy /Housing Need Demand Assessment (HNDA)

The preparation of a Housing Strategy is a mandatory requirement under Part V of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended. The purpose of the Housing Strategy is to evaluate the housing needs of the existing and future population in the County.

The NPF (NPO 37) also requires each local authority to develop a Housing Need Demand Assessment (HNDA) which must underpin and support the preparation of housing strategies and housing policy. A HNDA is defined as “a database which allows local authorities to run a number of different scenarios to inform key decisions on housing need and supply”. The HNDA will provide long-term estimates of future housing needs to support the preparation of Housing Strategies and inform housing policy outputs. While no formal guidance has issued regarding the expected requirements of the HNDA, the Department has published Section 28 Guidelines entitled ‘Housing Supply Target Methodology for Development Planning’. These Guidelines underpin the development of the projected demand for the  Housing Need and Demand Assessment (HNDA) tool for each county. The projected demand will inform the development of multi-annual social housing targets from 2021. As outlined in Section 3.1.3 this Plan must cater for an overall household demand of 3,107 households.

The Housing Strategy has determined that 926 households will not meet the affordability criteria for private rental. These households are considered to require social and affordable housing. This equates to 29.8% of the anticipated households during the plan period. In accordance with the Urban Regeneration and Housing Act 2015 there will be a requirement for up to 10% social housing in developments on lands zoned for residential use or a mixture of residential and other uses with more than nine residential units. Full details of the Housing Strategy are set out in Appendix IV.

The Council will continue to adopt housing service plans in accordance with the requirements of the Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2009 to cover the delivery and management of housing services as well as homelessness action plans and anti-social behaviour strategies. 

Housing Strategy / HNDA - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

HS. P1

To provide 3,107 new homes to meet expected future housing demand as identified in the HNDA. New homes shall be provided in a planned and coordinated manner in accordance with the aims and policies of the Core Strategy, the RSES, and the National Planning Framework.

HS. P2:

To ensure that housing is available to meet the needs of all people through the delivery of an appropriate mix of housing sizes, types, and tenures in suitable locations.

HS. P3

To provide for existing unmet housing need as identified by the Carlow County Council social housing needs assessment through the provision of social and affordable housing using a range of delivery mechanisms.

HS. P4:

To provide social and affordable housing to meet forecast future housing need over the plan period as identified in the HNDA. New units shall be delivered having regard to the aims and policies of the Core Strategy and the needs of local communities, including the need to deliver sustainable development, compact growth, social integration and an appropriate mix of housing types and tenures. Social and affordable housing shall be delivered through a range of mechanisms including provision directly by Carlow County Council, by Approved Housing Bodies, Repair and Lease Scheme, Buy and Renew and through short- and long-term leases arranged by the Council with private landlords.

HS. P5

To apply a 10% social housing requirement, pursuant to Part V of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended), to land zoned for residential use, or for a mixture of residential and other uses, except where development would be exempt from this requirement.

HS. P6

To support the on-going monitoring and review of the HNDA as appropriate in accordance with any forthcoming guidance on HNDA methodology issued by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage.

Housing Strategy / HNDA - Objectives

It is an objective of the Council to:

HS. O1

Promote the provision of social housing in accordance with the Council’s Housing Strategy, the Council’s Social Housing Delivery Programme and Government Policy as outlined in ‘Rebuilding Ireland: Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness and any future strategy.

HS. O2

Endeavour to deliver unmet housing need as identified by the social housing needs assessment over the plan period 2022-2028 as resources allow.

3.5          Housing in Towns and Villages 

Residential growth within the County will occur in line with the provisions of the Core Strategy. Residential schemes will be directed to settlements focusing on:

  • Existing built up areas, promoting compact growth through the development of infill sites and development of brownfield / regeneration sites.
  • Creation of new residential communities on zoned lands within the settlement boundaries.
  • Consolidating the growth of rural villages in line with the Core Strategy to support vibrant and viable centres.

Key Considerations for Housing Delivery include:

Appropriately located / sited development with reference to the Core Strategy, any LAP, Small Town Plan  or village boundary as appropriate.

Capacity of required enabling infrastructure including physical infrastructure such as water and wastewater, roads/ footpaths and social infrastructure.

High quality design, compliance with development management standards and the creation of attractive places to live being the focus of every development.

Contribute to placemaking, high quality public realm and sense of place by responding positively to local surroundings.

Promote the creation of a connected environment with the creation of permeable streets that promote walking and cycling and provide direct and safe routes to adjoining developments, town / village centres and community / social infrastructure.

Comply with the principles, approaches and standards set out in the ‘Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets’ (2013/2019) and any further update.

Provision of appropriate density of development with reference to the settlement’s position in the overall Settlement Hierarchy.

Provide for an appropriate mix and design of house types including building heights and typologies where appropriate while supporting schemes with lifetime adaptable homes that will support the creation of sustainable communities.

Design should be informed by potential implications of climate change together with the need to improve energy efficiency of buildings / schemes.

Capacity of the environment to accommodate the development  (i.e. assimilative capacity of the receiving environment, potential for adverse effects on Natura 2000 Sites, Flood Risk considerations etc.).

Table 3.2 Key Considerations for Housing Delivery

Town and village centres have a key role and function as places to shop, work, access services and community facilities, visit, spend time and live. Many of our towns and villages contain vacant and underused buildings which among other commercial uses can support town centre living.  It is acknowledged that people residing in town centres is central to creating a thriving, resilient and sustainable town centre.

Housing in Towns and Villages  - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

TV. P1

Actively support proposals that encourage mixed use town centres including residential schemes, the  conversion of upper floors of buildings, reuse of vacant / underutilised buildings and sites into residential use in order to revitalise the social and physical fabric of urban centres in the County. Where appropriate the Council may consider a relaxation of development standards for such projects subject to the provision of good quality accommodation.

TV. P2

Enhance and develop the fabric of existing urban and rural settlements in accordance with principles of good urban design.

3.6 Creating Sustainable Communities and Neighbourhoods

‘Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas’ (2009)  defines sustainable communities as “areas where an efficient use of land, high quality urban design an effective integration in the provision of physical and social infrastructure such as public transport, schools, amenities and other facilities combine to create places where people want to live”. With an increasing emphasis on compact growth and more consolidated urban forms it is critical that growth provides for the creation of sustainable neighbourhoods and communities. The County Carlow Local Economic and Community Plan 2015-2021 identifies the need to build thriving, resilient, sustainable and inclusive communities as a strategic high-level goal. Features of sustainable communities include;

  • Providing an appropriate mix of connected land uses with economic investment to support the resident population thereby minimising transport demand and improving quality of life.
  • Promoting the ’10-minute’ settlement concept, where a range of facilities and services are accessible in a short walking and cycling timeframe from homes or are accessible by quality public transport located within a short walk from home.
  • Promoting social integration that supports the creation of mixed tenure communities where there is an appropriate mix of housing to meet the needs of the entire community.
  • Ensuring appropriate social and community infrastructure is provided as required.
  • Presenting an attractive, high quality and well-maintained appearance with a distinct sense of place and a quality public realm.
  • Promoting sustainable building, the efficient use of land and of energy and minimising greenhouse gas emissions.

This Plan seeks to support the continued development of sustainable neighbourhoods and communities having regard to the foregoing criteria throughout the County. The provision of neighbourhood infrastructure (i.e. land or buildings related to serving the needs of the local and wider community for social, educational, health, religious, recreational, leisure, cultural and civic needs) should not only match the requirements of existing neighbourhoods but should anticipate future development and emerging demographics. Healthy living will be promoted by encouraging compact growth, the development of infill and brownfield sites, high quality residential developments with a suitable mix of housing proximate to local and community services / facilities.

Creating Sustainable Communities and Neighbourhoods - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

SC. P1

Support the development of quality residential schemes with a range of housing options having regard to the standards, principles and any specific planning policy requirements (SPPRs) set out in the ‘Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas Guidelines for Planning Authorities’ (2009); ‘Urban Development and Building Heights Guidelines for Planning Authorities’ (2018) and the ‘Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments, Guidelines for Planning Authorities’ (2020) (Refer: Chapter 16: Development Management and Appendix IX re: SPPR’s)

SC. P2

Continue to support the creation of sustainable residential communities throughout the County by facilitating the creation of attractive mixed tenure neighbourhoods with supporting social and community infrastructure with strong links and connections to local services, community facilities and employment areas.

SC. P3

Promote energy conservation, energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy services in new and existing buildings, including retro-fitting of energy efficiency measures in existing building stock, energy efficiency in traditional buildings and initiatives to achieve Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (NZEB) standards in line with the Energy Performance of Buildings (EPBD).

3.7          Quality Design and Placemaking in Residential Developments

Quality design and healthy placemaking are emphasised throughout the NPF and RSES. The built environment strongly influences our health and well-being. The NPF states that ‘quality of design is critical for making places attractive and distinctive. Architectural quality and well-designed spaces can help to enhance our urban areas and create desirable places in which people want to live, work or visit and contribute to ongoing quality of life and well-being.’

Urban design involves the design of buildings, groups of buildings, spaces and landscapes and establishing the processes that make successful developments possible, It  encompasses the way a place works as well as how it looks. The Council is committed to ensuring that good urban design principles are applied in the design and planning of existing and new development areas. The ‘Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas’ (2009) and accompanying ‘Urban Design Manual – A Best Practice Guide’ provide detailed guidance on design issues and should be referenced for proposed development schemes. Chapter 12 also outlined detailed urban design considerations which should be considered for future urban applications.

Health placemaking incorporates high quality urban design, promoting active lifestyles through good quality pedestrian and cycling links, particularly to and from places of work, education and recreation.  Considerations to inform healthy placemaking include:

  • Promoting good urban design to create vibrant urban centres and attractive safe and accessible public spaces.
  • Prioritises walking, cycling and sustainable travel in the planning, layout and design of places.
  • Providing good connectivity and infrastructure to attract investment and diversify local economies.
  • Ensuring good access to health, education and services.
  • Providing access to green areas, play and active recreation opportunities.
  • Promoting arts, culture and heritage led regeneration as key to our identity and the character of places.

Quality Design and Placemaking – Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

DP. P1

Seek to ensure that residential developments are of a high-quality design cognisant of context and inclusivity with a focus on healthy placemaking, enhancing the public realm and are informed by the guidance principles set out in the ‘Urban Design Manual – A Best Practice Guide’ and the ‘Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets’.

DP. P2

Require all residential schemes to be design led, to address urban design, landscape and building design issues clearly explaining the development process, the design options considered and the rationale behind the proposed development strategy.

DP. P3

Encourage high quality design and innovation in architectural design that delivers buildings of a high quality that positively contribute to the built environment and local streetscape.

DP. P4

Encourage building design and layout that maximises daylight and natural ventilation and incorporates energy efficiency and conservation measures that will improve the environmental performance of buildings in line with best practice.

DP. P5

Require that all new residential development applications of 50 units or more in larger urban centres (Tier 1 and 2), 20 units or more in smaller towns (Tier 3) and 10 units or more in serviced villages (Tier 4 and 5) are accompanied by a Social Infrastructure
Assessment (SIA) to determine if social and community facilities in the area are sufficient to provide for the needs of the future residents. 

3.8          Densities / Increased Heights

The ‘Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas’ Guidelines and accompanying ‘Urban Design Manual’ and Circular Letter NRUP 02/2021 outline recommendations regarding appropriate densities for different contexts based on site factors and the level of access to services and facilities, including transport.

Having regard to the settlement hierarchy, provision of higher densities (35 units per ha or more) are most appropriate within Carlow Town Centre and regeneration sites proximate to the public transport network subject to good design and development management standards being met.

It is acknowledged that there may be some limited opportunities to promote higher density (30/ha) in the town centres of Tullow and Muine Bheag (District Towns) creating more vibrant town centres and maximising the return on infrastructure subject to good design, protection of environmental and visual amenities and development management standards being met.

It should be noted that higher density residential development however may be constrained by Architectural Conservations Areas, Protected Structures and other heritage designations. Any new residential developments will be required to assess such impacts and seek to minimise any adverse effects in terms of height, scale, massing and proximity.

Where higher densities are being considered this is likely to give rise to an increased building height which should be informed by The Urban Development and Building Heights Guidelines published in 2018. Buildings of increased height should be appropriately located, of high quality design and designed to protect and enhance the existing streetscape and heritage characteristics of the area. (Ref: Section 12.8.8 and Policy DN P6).

In the Smaller Towns a density of between 25 -30 units/ha maybe appropriate in town centres whilst in villages any development should be appropriately designed and have regard to the prevailing density in the locality together with the availability of public services. Table 3.3 outlines indicative net densities for Tier 1-3 Settlements within the County.

 

 

Town Centre

Edge of Centre

Carlow Town

>35ha

25-30ha

Tullow

Muine Bheag

<30ha

20-30ha

Smaller Towns

25-30ha

20-25ha**

Table 3.3: Indicative Net Densities Tier 1-3 Settlements

** Lower density residential development  and serviced sites will be facilitated on appropriate sites within smaller towns and villages within the rural area in compliance with the programme for ‘new homes in small towns and villages’ NPO 18(b) .

Densities / Increased Heights - Policies

It is the policy of the Council:

DN. P1

To promote compact urban growth through the consolidation and re-intensification of infill/ brownfield sites.

DN. P2

Encourage higher residential densities in town centre / regeneration sites proximate to public transport nodes in the higher order settlements (Carlow, Tullow and Muine Bheag) provided that proposals achieve a high-quality design and ensure a balance is achieved between the protection of residential and environmental amenities and the established character of the surrounding area, with the need to provide for high quality sustainable residential development.

DN. P3

Align higher densities at appropriate locations to the Key Town of Carlow, subject to good design and development management standards being met.

DN. P4

Apply graded densities in towns and villages having regard to their role in the Settlement Hierarchy and that are commensurate to the character of the existing built environment.

DN. P5

Support National Policy Objective (NPO) 18b of Project Ireland 2040  which makes provision to develop a programme for ‘new homes in small towns and villages’. Subject to the availability of resources the Council will support the provision of serviced sites with appropriate infrastructure to attract people to build their own homes in the small towns and villages throughout the County.

DN. P6

Consider buildings of increased height in accordance with The Urban Development and Building Heights Guidelines published in 2018 in circumstances where the site / development is:

  • Appropriately located  in central areas of larger towns close to public transport or on strategic lands proximate to the town centre.
  • Comprise high quality design making a positive contribution in the streetscape, strengthening the sense of place while respecting and responding to the character of the area including nearby properties, especially residential properties or areas of public open space.
  • Designed to protect and enhance the existing streetscape and heritage characteristics of an area. Proposals should not disrupt or negatively impact on the historic areas of towns, protected structures or intrude on important views or vistas.

3.9          Mix of Units / Adaptable Housing / Tenure

Providing a good mix of house types creates neighbourhoods for people of different ages and lifestyles and promotes inclusion and quality of life. The changing character of household formation (trend to smaller household unit sizes) needs to be met with appropriate housing types and associated social and community services. Analysis carried out as part of the Housing Strategy and HNDA has forecasted household size cohorts over the plan period together with dwelling type forecasts (ref: Appendix IV). Any proposed residential schemes shall therefore be informed by the demographic and housing analysis as contained in the HNDA and informed by detailed local analysis including the demographic profile. Larger schemes shall contain a proportion of larger flexible housing units to ensure that such developments provide suitable and viable long-term adaptable options for families. Housing mix in any new development should also have regard to the provisions of ‘Housing Options for Our Ageing Population, Policy Statement’ (2019) and seek to provide suitable accommodation for older persons.

In order to mitigate against undue segregation of tenure type, new development should avoid an over proliferation of social housing in an any particular area. Regard shall be had to both existing and permitted house types and tenures within the adjoining area and shall clearly demonstrate how the proposed development will add to the housing mix / type located in the area.

Mix of Units / Adaptable Housing / Tenure – Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

MX. P1

Ensure that housing is available to meet the needs of all people, through the delivery of an appropriate mix of housing sizes, building typologies, types and tenures in suitable locations.

MX. P2

Encourage mixed and balanced communities in order to counteract undue social segregation in accordance with Part V Guidelines for Planning Authorities. Developers will be required where deemed appropriate to submit a report showing the overall scale of social housing in the immediate locale.

MX. P3

Promote the provision of a minimum of 5% universally designed units in schemes in excess of 20 units. Such units shall be in accordance with the requirements of ‘Building for Everyone: A Universal Design’ published by the Centre of Excellence in Universal Design.

3.10 Apartments

As recorded in Census 2016 11.8% of the dwelling stock within Carlow comprise apartments which is generally in line with the national average (12%). Sustainable Urban Housing Design Standards for New Apartments (DHLGH) updated in 2020 acknowledge that apartment developments will play a significant role in securing more compact and sustainable towns and cities and that they must be an attractive and desirable housing option if compact growth is to be achieved. The HNDA (Appendix IV) anticipated projected demand for apartments will account for c.6% of housing units over the Plan period. It is anticipated that the greatest demand for apartment type accommodation will be in Carlow Town followed by Tullow and Muine Bheag which provide higher levels of services, employment, access to public transport and amenities with more limited demand for such accommodation in smaller towns and villages. In this regard the Council may consider greater diversity and flexibility in housing schemes and may consider apartments as part of a mix of housing types in a given housing development in particular in town centre / regeneration locations (identified for residential / mixed use) in  Tier 1 and 2 Towns. (Refer Chapter 16: Development Management for Apartment Design Standards).

Apartments - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

AP. P1

Require apartment developments to be in accordance with Design Standards for New Apartments updated in 2020 or any amendments thereto during the life of this Plan.

3.12 Specific Needs Housing

Government policy aims to meet the diverse needs of all those requiring support, including specialist needs such as those of the elderly and people with disabilities. This includes provision of schemes to adapt housing to the needs of these groups. The strategy also supports the aims and ambitions of the National Housing Strategy for People with a Disability 2011-2016 to support people with disabilities to live independently in their own homes where possible and to provide sufficient housing adapted to the needs of people with disabilities.

3.12.1    Housing for Older Persons

An ageing population and the need to provide adaptable and suitable accommodation has also been recognised in the NPF (NPO 30) and the RSES (RPO 182). This is further supported  in the Policy Statement  “Housing Options for Our Ageing Population” (DHPLG, published in 2019) and The Age Friendly Principles Guidelines for Planning Authorities (Age Friendly Ireland, 2021).

At a local level, The Carlow Age Friendly Strategy outlines the County Council’s plan for implementing the Age Friendly County Initiative. Housing is a key part of building an age-friendly county. The Strategy identifies difficulties for older persons in maintaining their homes, adaptation of existing homes and absence of age-appropriate new homes. The Council supports the development of Age-Friendly communities including support for independent living and community facilities based on inclusive and universal design standards.

Housing for Older Persons – Policies

It is the policy of the Council to;

OP. P1

Facilitate the implementation of the Policy Statement ‘Housing Options for Our Ageing Population’ and promote the appropriate provision of housing for older people  including the provision of independent and / or assisted living such as purpose-built accommodation, the adaptation of existing properties and providing opportunities for older people to avail of ‘rightsizing’ within their community well served by social and community infrastructure and amenities such as footpaths, local shops, and public transport to facilitate better care in the community, independence and access.

OP. P2

Support the provision of single storey units in residential schemes that would provide older persons with the option of downsizing if desired.

3.12.2 Housing for People with Disabilities

The Council will support the provision of housing to cater for the needs of persons with special needs, such as persons with physical disabilities and/or learning disabilities. This accommodation should generally be appropriately located close to facilities and services.

Housing for People with Disabilities - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

HD. P1

Support independent and / or assisted living, respite and / residential care facilities for those with a disability in appropriate locations including provision for live-in care where required, when designing adapted housing units.

HD. P2

Require development to be in accordance with the Principles of Universal Design and the National Disability Authority’s publication ‘Building for Everyone: A Universal Design Approach’ and shall have regard to the Government’s ‘National Disability Inclusion Strategy 2017-2021’.

3.12.3    Homelessness / Emergency Accommodation

The Council will continue to work in conjunction with voluntary groups and other agencies in the provision of emergency accommodation for the homeless and for those in need of crisis facilities.

Homelessness / Emergency Accommodation - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

HR. P1

Support the provision of homeless accommodation and / or support services throughout the County.

HR. P2

Encourage and support,  Tusla, the Child and Family Agency, and other relevant agencies, the provision of Domestic Violence Accommodation or refuge space in the County which seek to provide appropriate Crisis Intervention Services within the County.

3.13 Student Accommodation

The provision of appropriate student accommodation for Carlow Institute of Technology and Carlow College St. Patrick’s will enable Carlow to continue to develop as a regional centre for education and research.  Purpose built student accommodation is generally of a higher density with a range of ancillary facilities appropriate for student living. Student accommodation should be located convenient to the educational facility by foot, bicycle or public transport and generally, either within the college campus or appropriately zoned and located lands within Carlow Town.

Student Accommodation - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to;

SA. P1

Facilitate provision of high quality purpose built and professionally managed student accommodation in line with the provisions of the National Student Accommodation Strategy (2017). Purpose built student accommodation should be provided on campus or in suitable locations which have convenient access to the colleges (particularly by foot, bicycle or public transport) in a manner compatible with surrounding residential and environmental amenities.

3.14        Traveller Accommodation

The Carlow County Council Traveller Accommodation Programme (TAP) is designed to meet the accommodation needs of the Travelling Community of County Carlow.  It is the policy of the Council’s Carlow Traveller   Accommodation Programme 2019-2024 to:

  • Provide sustainable, quality social affordable and cost-effective housing to meet current and future accommodation need.
  • Provide group and standard housing options as well as halting sites, temporary /emergency accommodation and single instance houses for the accommodation of Traveller households, who are indigenous to County Carlow, subject to resources in accordance with the Assessment of Need carried out under the Traveller Accommodation Act. Such options are, where feasible, provided in recognition of the need for Traveller-specific accommodation by some households.

The TAP sets out an assessment of accommodation need, finding that 122 Traveller households needed housing in 2019. The TAP estimates a total need of 245 families over the period 2019-2024 to be provided over the five-year programme to cater for the existing and projected demand. Under the existing programme the main source of accommodation units for Travellers will comprise social housing, which may include RAS, standard local authority accommodation, leased accommodation, HAP and AHBs. Traveller specific accommodation for the County’s indigenous Traveller Community will be provided where possible.

Traveller Accommodation- Policy

It is the policy of the Council to;

TA. P1

Implement the “Traveller Accommodation Programme 2019-2024” or any updated plan during the lifetime of this County Development Plan.

3.15        Other Residential Development in Urban Areas

Sustainable intensification of existing residential areas in urban areas can be achieved through infill development, development of large corner sites, the subdivision of larger houses, co-ordinated backland development, family flats and extension to dwelling houses.

Urban Infill and Backland Development

The development of underutilised infill, large corner sites and planned co-ordinated backland development in existing residential areas is generally encouraged. A balance is needed between the protection of amenities, privacy, the established character of the area and new residential infill. The use of contemporary and innovative design solutions may be considered for infill and backland development. Connections to the surrounding area and services should be identified and incorporated into proposals. Backland development proposals shall avoid piecemeal development that adversely impacts on the character.

Urban Infill and Backland Development - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

UI. P1

Encourage and promote the development of underutilised infill, corner and planned co-ordinated backland sites in existing urban areas subject to appropriate siting, compliance with development management standards for dwellings and the character of the area and the environment being protected.

Extensions to Dwellings

Domestic extensions are an effective way for homeowners to adapt to changing household needs. The design, scale and layout should have regard to the amenities of adjoining properties, particularly as regards overshadowing and privacy.

Extensions to Dwellings - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

ED. P1

Encourage sensitively designed extensions to existing dwellings in compliance with Development Management Criteria in Chapter 16 and which do not negatively impact on the environment or the residential amenities of surrounding properties or the local streetscape.

Family Flat

Family flats are a way of providing additional accommodation with a level of independence for an undefined temporary period of time. Applications for family flats will be considered subject to site suitability and to criteria set out in Chapter 16 of this Plan.

Family Flat - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

FF. P1

Facilitate the provision of an integrated family flat in circumstances where the planning authority is satisfied that the site is of an appropriate size to accommodate the development, where the development would not impact residential amenities of adjoining properties and where the proposal complies with the development management standards contained in Chapter 16.

3.16 Single Housing in the Countryside

The countryside is a source of some of the County’s most valuable assets and resources, including land, landscape and water resources, and natural and cultural heritage features.  In accordance with the NPF and RSES, the Council recognises that the countryside of County Carlow will continue to be, a living and lived-in landscape, with a focus on the requirements of its rural economy and its rural communities, based on agriculture, forestry, tourism, and rural enterprise.  A recognition of the need for housing for people to live and work in Carlow’s countryside requires careful planning to:

  • Ensure that demand, particularly in the most accessible areas around towns villages and rural settlements, can be managed to avoid ribbon and over-spill development;
  • Support revitalised towns, villages, and rural settlements;
  • Achieve sustainable compact growth targets; and,
  • Protect the County’s countryside assets, resources, and environmental qualities.

3.16.1 Rural Area Types 

National and regional level policy in the NPF and the RSES for the development of single houses in the rural countryside requires a distinction to be made between two types of rural areas, and prescribes criteria that must be adhered to in the assessment of development proposals for single houses:

  1. Rural areas under urban influence (i.e. areas within the commuter catchment of Dublin and Waterford, large towns, and centres of employment).  Having regard to the viability of smaller towns and rural settlements, facilitate the provision of single houses in the countryside based on the core consideration of demonstrable economic or social need to live in a rural area, as well as siting, environmental, and design criteria for rural housing in statutory guidelines and plans.
  2. Rural areas elsewhere (i.e. areas outside of these commuter catchments).  Having regard for the viability of smaller towns and rural settlements, facilitate the provision of single housing in the countryside based on siting and design criteria for rural housing in statutory guidelines and plans.

Taking account of the foregoing, a rural typology of County Carlow was undertaken and mapped. Criteria which informed rural policy zones is outlined in Section 2.8.5. The approach is consistent with the NPF and RSES.

Two Rural Housing Policy Zones have been identified for the County and are outlined in Map 3.1:

Table 3.4 Rural Housing Policy Zones

Policy Zone

Description

Zone 1

Rural Areas Under Urban Influence

Zone 2

Other Rural Areas

Map 3.1 Map 3.1: Rural Housing Policy Zones

3.16.2 Rural Generated Housing Need

To facilitate rural generated housing needs and the management and delivery of single rural housing over the period of this Plan, and in accordance with the NPF (NPO 19) and RSES (RPO 27), the two Rural Housing Policy Zones have been allocated a specific set of qualifying criteria.

In order for an applicant to be considered eligible for a single house in the countryside of County Carlow, they must be able to demonstrate that they comply with all the criteria listed for one of the Rural Housing Policy Zones.

  Rural Housing Policy Zone 1                

Having regard to:

  • the viability of smaller towns and rural settlements in County Carlow; and,
  • the need to protect the County’s key economic, environmental, natural resources and heritage assets, such as important landscapes, habitats and built heritage, water quality, and the public road network,

-  the Council shall consider a single house in the countryside for the permanent occupation of an applicant in Rural Areas Under Urban Influence where compliance with the criteria listed for Category 1 or Category 2 can be demonstrated as detailed in Table 3.5 on page 64.  Please note that compliance with only one of the Categories must be demonstrated.
 

  Rural Housing Policy Zone 2                

Having regard to:

  • the viability of smaller towns and rural settlements in County Carlow;
  • the need to sustain the social and economic well-being of rural communities; and,
  • the need to protect the County’s key economic, environmental, natural resources and heritage assets, such as important landscapes, habitats and built heritage, water quality, and the public road network,

- the Council shall consider a single house in the countryside for the permanent occupation of an applicant in Other Rural Areas where compliance with all the criteria listed in Table 3.6 on page 65 can be demonstrated.

RURAL HOUSING POLICY ZONE 1

RURAL AREAS UNDER URBAN INFLUENCE

CATEGORY 1: 

CRITERIA FOR FUNCTIONAL ECONOMIC REQUIREMENT

 

OR

CATEGORY 2:

CRITERIA FOR FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL REQUIREMENT

The applicant shall demonstrate with relevant documentary proof, that they have a functional economic requirement to live in this rural area and wish to build a home for their own use.  This includes persons who:

(i) have existing occupational or employment related ties to the rural area, such as those involved in full-time agriculture, horticulture, forestry, as well as similar rural-based occupations, and where it can be adequately demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Planning Authority that it is their predominant occupation;

or

(ii) can demonstrate their commitment to operate a full-time business from their proposed house in the rural area. The nature, viability, and location of any such business must be dependent on, and intrinsically linked to, the rural area.  This must be supported by a business plan prepared by a suitably qualified and competent professional. 

 

 

 

The applicant shall demonstrate with relevant documentary proof that they have a functional social requirement to live in this rural area, and wish to build a home for their own use.  This includes persons who can demonstrate that they are living or have lived full-time in the local rural area for a minimum of 7 consecutive years at any stage prior to the making of the planning application, including returning migrants seeking a permanent home in their local rural area.  For the purposes of this policy, ‘local rural area’ is defined as a site within an 8km radius of where the applicant is living or has lived.  

 

Where an application for a rural house is being made on the basis of Category 1 or Category 2, the applicant shall also demonstrate:

  • that they do not own or have not been previously granted permission for a single house in the countryside in County Carlow and have not sold this house to an unrelated third party, save in exceptional circumstances; and,
  • compliance with all normal siting and design considerations.  (Refer to also to Policy RH P6)

Table 3.5:    Rural Housing Policy Zone 1 Categories and Criteria
 

RURAL HOUSING POLICY ZONE 2

OTHER RURAL AREAS

CRITERIA

(a) The applicant shall demonstrate compliance with all normal siting and design requirements.  (Refer also to Policy RH P6)

(b) The applicant shall demonstrate that they are seeking to build their home in the rural area for their own full-time occupation, that they do not own or have not been previously granted permission for a single house in the countryside in County Carlow and have not sold this house to an unrelated third party, save in exceptional circumstances. 

Table 3.6:    Rural Housing Policy Zone 2 Criteria

 

3.16.3 Rural Housing - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

Rural Housing Policy Zones and Criteria

RH. P1

Manage the demand for single houses in the countryside of County Carlow in accordance with the Rural Housing Policy Zones shown on Map Ref. 3.1 and the corresponding criteria listed in Section 3.16.2.  Documentary proof of compliance with the criteria listed must be submitted with a planning application. 

Occupancy

RH. P2

Restrict the occupancy of a rural house as a permanent place of residence for a period of 7 years to the applicant/occupant who demonstrate compliance with the rural housing policy criteria.

Speculative Rural Housing

RH. P3

Not permit speculative rural housing in the countryside, and to restrict rural housing on a landholding where there is a history of the speculative sale of sites, notwithstanding an applicant’s compliance with rural housing policy criteria. 

Local Exceptional Circumstances

RH. P4

Recognise that local exceptional circumstances may require a person to live in a particular location.  This includes (i) exceptional health needs, where supported by relevant documentation from a registered medical practitioner, or (ii) exceptional personal needs such as the requirement to sell a rural house on foot of a court order (e.g. following a divorce or legal separation), where supported by relevant documentation from a registered legal practitioner.  

3.16.4 Persons Residing in Bordering Counties - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P5

Consider applications for single housing in the countryside from applicants in neighbouring counties who are living or have lived full-time  for a minimum period of 10 consecutive years at a location within a 3km radius of the Carlow County border, at any stage prior to the making of the planning application, and subject to the following:

  1. Where Rural Housing Policy Zone 1 applies, the applicant shall demonstrate compliance with Category 1, parts (a), (b) and (c), or with Category 2, parts (a), (b) and (c). 
  2. Where Rural Housing Policy Zone 2 applies, the applicant shall demonstrate compliance with parts (a) and (b).
  3. The proposed site shall be within an 8km radius of where the applicant is living or has lived full-time for a minimum period of 10 consecutive years.

3.16.5    Siting and Design - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P6

Ensure, in addition to the requirement to comply with the rural housing policy criteria, that applicants demonstrate compliance with all normal siting and design requirements.  The siting, layout and design of a new rural house shall appropriately integrate with its physical surroundings, including the natural and built heritage of the area, taking account of:

  1. The Rural Housing Design Guidelines in Chapter 13.
  2. The character, sensitivity and capacity of the County’s landscape as detailed in Chapter 9.
  3. The capacity of the area to absorb further development, taking account of the extent of existing development in the area, the extent of ribbon development in the area, the degree of existing haphazard or piecemeal development in the area, and the degree of development on a single original landholding.
  4. The protection and preservation of features in the landscape that contribute to local distinctiveness, attractiveness, and ecology, and which can assist in visually absorbing rural housing into its countryside.  These features include hedgerows, trees, sod/stone banks and stone walls, historic and archaeological landscapes, water bodies, ridges, skylines, topographical features and important views and prospects.  Recessed development located / set back into the landscape away from the public road may be considered where the siting is appropriate to the rural context and provides for the protection of environmental, visual and residential amenities.
  5. The ability to provide a safe vehicular entrance in accordance with the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges (D.M.R.B), and without the need to remove an extensive amount of hedgerow or trees to achieve sightlines.
  6. The ability of a site to accommodate an on-site wastewater treatment system in compliance with the EPA Code of compliance with the 2021 EPA Code of Practice for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems Serving Single Houses p.e. ≤ 10.
  7. The ability of a site to accommodate an appropriate on-site surface water management system in accordance with Council policy and the Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS), B.S. 8301:1985 and BRE Digest 365.
  8. The need to comply with the requirements of The Planning System and Flood Risk Management Guidelines for Planning Authorities DoEHLG and OPW (2009).

3.16.6    Piecemeal and Haphazard Development - Policies

Urban generated pressure for rural housing, if not properly managed, can result in piecemeal and haphazard development along the approach roads to the County’s towns, villages, and rural settlements.

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P7

Control the level of piecemeal and haphazard development in rural areas close to towns, villages and rural settlements having regard to potential impacts on:  

  1. The orderly and efficient development of newly developing areas on the edges of towns and villages; and
  2. The future provision of infrastructure such as roads and electricity lines etc.
RH. P8

Preserve and protect the open character of transitional lands outside of towns, villages, and rural settlements, in order to prevent linear sprawl and ribbon development extending these areas and to maintain a clear demarcation and distinction between urban areas and the countryside.

3.16.7   Backland Development in the Countryside - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P9

Discourage the development of rural housing in the countryside located on backland to the rear of an existing house(s) with road frontage.  This form of backland development is inconsistent with the recommendations of the Sustainable Rural Housing Guidelines (2005), militates against the preservation of the rural environment, represents piecemeal and haphazard development in the countryside, and can negatively impact on the residential amenity of neighbouring houses.  

3.16.8    Ribbon Development

The Sustainable Rural Housing Guidelines (2005) define ribbon development in the countryside as five or more houses alongside 250 metres of road frontage.   Ribbon development is undesirable as it creates numerous accesses onto traffic routes, sterilises back lands, land locks farmland, creates servicing problems (water supply, drainage, footpaths and lighting) and intrudes on public views of the rural hinterland.

Ribbon Development - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P10

Discourage ribbon development, and to assess whether a development proposal will exacerbate ribbon development, having regard to:

  1. The type of rural area and circumstances of the applicant;
  2. The degree to which the proposal might be considered infill development; (see Policy RH P11)
  3. The degree to which existing ribbon development would coalesce as a result of the proposed development; and,
  4. Local circumstances, including the planning history of the area and development pressures.

3.16.9    Infill (Gap) Sites - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P11

Give consideration to single housing  on infill (gap) sites in a continuous line of existing houses with road frontage, provided the character, scale, layout, design, building line etc.  of the existing pattern of development along the road frontage is respected, and subject to compliance with normal siting and design requirements.  To qualify as an infill (gap) site it must be adjoined on either side by a fully built and occupied dwelling/residential property.

3.16.10     Replacement of Habitable Houses in the Countryside - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P12

Favourably consider the replacement of a single house in the countryside in circumstances where such a house is habitable, subject to the following:

  1. The structure must last have been used as a dwelling house and the internal and external walls and roof must be intact.
  2. A report from a suitably qualified competent person shall be submitted to verify that the house is habitable but that its replacement is the most sustainable option.
  3. Documentary evidence of the most recent date of occupation of the house must be submitted with the application.
  4. The proposed replacement house shall be subject to normal siting and design requirements. 
  5. A condition requiring the demolition of the existing house will normally be included in any grant of permission.
  6. The applicant/occupant will not be required to comply with rural housing policy criteria.
  7. Notwithstanding parts (i) to (vi), it is the policy of the Council to protect the County’s vernacular building stock from demolition where restoration and extension is an option. 

3.16.11      Replacement of Derelict Houses in the Countryside - Policy

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P13

Facilitate the sensitive replacement of a structurally unsound derelict house (i.e. structure in ruinous or dangerous condition) as an alternative to the construction of a new single house elsewhere in the countryside.  The development proposal, in terms of siting, scale, layout and design, shall be sympathetic to the character of the original structure and the site.  Documentary evidence in the form of a structural survey and photographs shall be submitted in support of the application. All other normal siting and design requirements will be applied, and the applicant/occupant will not be required to comply with rural housing policy criteria.

3.16.12    Restoration and Re-Use of  Vernacular Structures and Houses in the Countryside - Policy

Vernacular structures and houses in the countryside include the more modest and ordinary domestic buildings that reflect local traditional building forms and types. These structures contribute to the distinctive local character and built heritage of the County, and retaining, restoring, and reusing them exemplifies sustainable development. 

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P14

Encourage and promote the sensitive restoration and reuse of a derelict vernacular structure or house as an alternative to the construction of a new single house elsewhere in the countryside, subject to the following:

  1. The vernacular structure or house must be capable of being suitably restored to habitable accommodation in keeping with its original character and without the necessity to demolish or significantly alter it.
  2. The submission of documentary evidence, including a structural survey and photographs.
  3. The distinctive character and original historic fabric of the structure should be retained using appropriate traditional construction methods and materials.
  4. The development shall be subject to normal siting and design requirements. 
  5. The applicant/occupant will not be required to comply with rural housing policy criteria.

3.16.13    Holiday Homes and Tourist Accommodation

The Council recognises the importance of holiday home and tourist accommodation to the development of the tourism industry in the County, and its role in supporting revitalised villages and rural settlements.  However, it is also recognised, if uncontrolled, this type of development can have a negative impact in the countryside.  In order to achieve an appropriate balance, the Council will seek to channel this type of development to areas that can best accommodate it, thereby facilitating maximum benefit to towns, villages, rural settlements and the local economy. 

Holiday Homes and Tourist Accommodation - Policies

It is the policy of the Council to:

RH. P15

Facilitate appropriately sited, scaled and designed holiday home and tourist accommodation developments in locations that can best accommodate them, such as towns, villages and rural settlements, where infrastructure/services/facilities are more readily available and accessible.

RH. P16

Generally, not permit holiday home and tourist accommodation developments in the countryside.  However, in certain cases, this type of development, by its nature, may require a rural location, and in this regard, consideration will be given to:

  1. The re-use of second-hand rural housing stock in the countryside or the refurbishment of derelict dwellings/structures.
  2. The re-use of redundant farm buildings for owner run agri-tourism enterprises. It will normally be a condition of permission that housing associated with agritourism enterprises should be retained within the farm complex ownership and shall not be individually sold.
  3. Housing for tourists at golf courses or other such recreational attractions, or as part of a major integrated tourism development.  In such cases, proposals will only be acceptable in the countryside in exceptional circumstances where the proposal is of such strategic significance that it is of benefit on a county, regional or national scale. It will also be a requirement that all housing shall be retained within the ownership of the tourism enterprise and shall not be individually sold.
RH. P17 Require planning permission for holiday home and tourist accommodation developments on unzoned lands to be subject to an agreement pursuant to Section 47 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended), prohibiting the sale of individual units.

 

Contents

Home

Please see attached submission of 3cea on the Housing Chapter
Population and Housing Include planning provisions for the requirement of environmentally sustainable nest boxes for bats and swifts to encourage urban biodiversity in largescale new...
Submission to Carlow County Council Draft County Development Plan  Background to the Irish Traveller Movement Founded in 1990, the Irish Traveller Movement is the national...
To Whom It May Concern: I wish to support the following submission CLW-C10-17 in relation to the Tinryland area.  In relation to individual and once off housing, it is very...
Population and Housing Include planning provisions for the requirement of environmentally sustainable nest boxes for bats and swifts to encourage urban biodiversity in largescale new...